Do you know why you get out of bed every day? Perhaps because the alarm goes off, or because you have to take the kids to daycare, but what follows after that? Are you going to the office to earn your keep, or are you going to make a difference for yourself, your colleague’s, your organisation and possibly even for the world? 

Hire the behaviour, teach the skills

There are, of course, practical aspects to going to work every day: a job ensures you will have food on the table. But is that really the “why” of a (future) employment relationship? And why is this “why” so important? In our blog ‘recruiter, do you know who you are hiring?’ we wrote about the importance of the “who”. Someone’s potential is far more interesting than someone’s past accomplishments. You can always teach someone new skills, but teaching new behaviour is difficult, or even impossible!

A reason to get up in the morning

Do you want a new job because you have to pay off your mortgage, or do you want to be part of a business that would like to contribute something to the world?

Would you like a new employee because there is simply a vacancy, or are you looking for someone with the right motivation to take your business to the next level?

Are you looking for a new job, or actually for a new colleague? Ask yourself the above questions to find out.

The wonders of why

The “why” is as important as the “who”. Simon Sinek shows in his book ‘start with why’ that businesses that focus on the “why” of their company, are more successful, influential and innovative. Leadership styles can vary, but all the great, inspirational leaders have one thing in common: they know very well why they are doing what they are doing. This doesn’t only work for businesses, but also for individuals. Knowing why you are doing what you are doing helps you to connect with your drives and motivation, in other words, the reason you get out of bed every day. When your alarm goes off tomorrow, why don’t you check with yourself: why am I getting out of bed today?